Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily


04/05/2017 11:08 PM
Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae
Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion, report scientists.

04/05/2017 10:09 PM
Helpful tool allows physicians to more accurately predict parathyroid cancer recurrence
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results.

04/05/2017 10:09 PM
Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study.

04/05/2017 10:09 PM
Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials
Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.

04/05/2017 09:28 PM
First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD
The first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder has been released by physicians. The results appear to be promising.

04/05/2017 09:28 PM
Hubble's bright shining lizard star
The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy.

04/05/2017 09:28 PM
Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale
Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties.

04/05/2017 08:14 PM
The swollen colon: Cause of chronic inflammation discovered
Too much of the oncogene Bcl-3 leads to chronic intestinal diseases, report investigators. They describe in a new report exactly how it throws the immune system off-balance.

04/05/2017 08:14 PM
Antibiotics counteract the beneficial effect of whole grain
Antibiotics may impede the health properties of whole grain, especially for women, recent study demonstrates. The results emphasize the importance of maintaining a restrictive use of antibiotics.

04/05/2017 08:14 PM
Further knowledge required about the differences between milk proteins
Recent years have witnessed significant debates on proteins in milk, in particular the differences between A1 and A2 proteins. However, there is still no scientific evidence to determine whether milk with one protein type is healthier than the other.

04/05/2017 08:13 PM
New material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment
The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics. Despite having the texture of a gel, this compound is endowed with great mechanical resistance and consistency, and is able to adapt to changing environments.

04/05/2017 08:13 PM
Study revises the development, evolutionary origin of the vertebrate brain
Researchers have made the first detailed map of the regions into which the brain of one of the most closely-related organisms to the vertebrates is divided and which could give us an idea of what our ancestor was like.

04/05/2017 08:13 PM
Thin layers of water hold promise for the energy storage of the future
Researchers have found that a material which incorporates atomically thin layers of water is able to store and deliver energy much more quickly than the same material that doesn't include the water layers. The finding raises some interesting questions about the behavior of liquids when confined at this scale and holds promise for shaping future energy-storage technologies.

04/05/2017 07:32 PM
Mining: Bacteria with Midas touch for efficient gold processing
Special 'nugget-producing' bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, research has shown.

04/05/2017 07:32 PM
Weather extremes and trade policies were main drivers of wheat price peaks
Price peaks of wheat on the world market are mainly caused by production shocks such as induced for example by droughts, researchers found. These shocks get exacerbated by low storage levels as well as protective trade policies, the analysis of global data deriving from the US Department of Agriculture shows. In contrast to widespread assumptions, neither speculation across stock or commodity markets nor land-use for biofuel production were decisive for annual wheat price changes in the past four decades.

04/05/2017 07:32 PM
No, complex is not complicated -- it is rather simple
The simplest experimental system to date to identify the minimum requirements for the emergence of complexity has been developed.

04/05/2017 07:32 PM
Fast, low energy, and continuous biofuel extraction from microalgae
Researchers have used a nanosecond pulsed electric field to extract hydrocarbons from microalgae. By using the shorter duration pulse, they were able to extract a large amount of hydrocarbons from the microalgae in a shorter amount of time, using less energy, and in a more efficient manner than current methods.

04/05/2017 07:32 PM
Expert unravels disease that took the hearing of world-famos painter
Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1793, Goya, then 46, came down with a severe, undiagnosed illness. His hearing never returned. Now, a hearing expert has developed a diagnosis. She thinks Goya likely suffered from an autoimmune disease.

04/05/2017 07:31 PM
Solar system: New insights into ring system
Astronomers have modeled the two rings around Chariklo, the smallest body in the Solar System known to have rings. This is the first time an entire ring system has been simulated using realistic sizes for the ring particles. The simulation revealed that the ring particles are much smaller than predicted or that an undiscovered shepherd satellite around Chariklo is stabilizing the ring.

04/05/2017 07:31 PM
Success in the 3-D bioprinting of cartilage
A team of researchers has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter. The fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure.

04/05/2017 07:31 PM
The world's fastest film camera: When light practically stands still
Forget high-speed cameras capturing 100,000 images per second. A research group has developed a camera that can film at a rate equivalent to five trillion images per second, or events as short as 0.2 trillionths of a second. This is faster than has previously been possible.

04/05/2017 07:31 PM
Unlikely pair of plants named after stars of movie 'twins'
Biologists have named an unlikely pair of plants after Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito, the stars of the 1988 movie Twins.

04/05/2017 06:37 PM
Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancer
Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds new research.

04/05/2017 06:36 PM
Symbiotic bacteria: From hitchhiker to beetle bodyguard
Bacterial symbionts transition between plant pathogenicity and insect defensive mutualism, a new report demonstrates. The bacterium Burkholderia gladioli lives in specific organs of a plant-feeding beetle and defends the insect's eggs from detrimental fungi by producing antibiotics. However, when transferred to a plant, the bacterium can spread throughout the tissues and negatively affect the plant.

04/05/2017 06:36 PM
Primary school children get less active with age, study finds
There is an age-related decline in children’s physical activity levels as they progress through primary school, according to a British study.

04/05/2017 06:36 PM
New appetite control mechanism found in brain
A newly discovered molecule increases appetite during fasting, and decreases it during gorging. The neuron-exciting protein, named NPGL – apparently aims to maintain body mass at a constant, come feast or famine. An evolutionary masterstroke, but not great news for those looking to trim down, or beef up for the summer.

04/05/2017 06:26 PM
When the smoke clears: Tobacco control in post-conflict settings
The difficulties of prioritizing preventable disease and long term health issues in post conflict zones are explored in a new report.

04/05/2017 06:26 PM
Single gene encourages growth of intestinal stem cells, supporting 'niche' cells, and cancer
A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study. The finding adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects for regenerative medicine and cancer treatments.

04/05/2017 05:00 AM
Female partners can help facilitate early melanoma detection in men over 50, research shows
Men over 50 have a higher risk than the general population of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, so they need to keep a sharp eye out for signs of the disease. Many women in this age group, however, would attest that they’re more likely than their male partners to notice suspicious spots on the skin — which means women could help save their male partners’ lives by helping them spot skin cancer.

04/05/2017 05:00 AM
Artificial intelligence shows potential to fight blindness
Researchers have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes.

04/05/2017 04:18 AM
Study quantifies kidney failure risk in living kidney donors
Researchers have developed a risk calculator that estimates the risk of kidney failure after donation. Overall risk was low, but black race and male sex were associated with increased risks of developing kidney failure in living kidney donors. Older age was associated with greater kidney failure risk in nonblack donors, but not in in black donors. Higher BMI and a close biological relationship to the recipient were also associated with increased risks of kidney failure.

04/05/2017 04:18 AM
Overweight/obese people with diabetes at increased risk of brain abnormalities
Overweight and obese individuals with early stage type 2 diabetes (T2D) had more severe and progressive abnormalities in brain structure and cognition compared to normal-weight study participants, research indicates.

04/05/2017 04:18 AM
Protein 'spy' gains new abilities
A method to rapidly trigger the universal tagging of proteins being produced by a cell has now been discovered by researchers. The tagging can be turned on like a switch, which enables researchers to acquire a snapshot of proteins being produced by a cell at a given time.

04/05/2017 04:18 AM
Food insecurity can affect your mental health
Food insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people's health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study determined that FI was associated with poorer mental health and specific psychosocial stressors across global regions (149 countries), independent of individuals' socioeconomic status.

04/05/2017 04:18 AM
Left-handed people are more likely to have a slender face
Individuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shaped human evolution and which today affects 2 billion people.

04/05/2017 01:30 AM
Trauma surgeon seeing rise in burns from electronic cigarettes
Burn surgeons are seeing a rise in burns from electronic cigarettes. The study points to lithium ion battery failure as the culprit.

04/05/2017 01:30 AM
A little support from their online friends calms test-anxious students
Reading supportive comments, 'likes' and private messages from social media friends prior to taking a test may help college students who have high levels of test-anxiety significantly reduce their nervousness and improve their scores, a new study suggests.

04/05/2017 12:35 AM
Treatment improved overall survival in elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer
Elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.

04/05/2017 12:35 AM
Staking self-worth on the pursuit of money has negative psychological consequences
Although people living in consumer-based cultures such as the US often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit.

04/05/2017 12:35 AM
Ssafer alternative to lithium-ion batteries
Researchers have developed a breakthrough alternative to fire-prone lithium-ion batteries.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Blood test predicts kids at risk for dengue shock syndrome
The most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the body
The collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Tibetan people have multiple adaptations for life at high altitudes
The Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Physical activity helps to counteract weight gain from obesity-causing gene variant
Physical activity can reduce the weight-gaining effects of the genetic variant that carries the greatest risk of obesity, report.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Scythian horse breeding unveiled: Lessons for animal domestication
A new study unveils the secrets of horse breeding by Iron Age Scythian nomads. The genomes reconstructed from 14 archaeological horses also provide important insights into the process of animal domestication, supporting changes in the neural crest development pathway as key to the emergence of common domestic traits and revealing major changes in breeding practice during the last 2,300 years.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Neurons' faulty wiring leads to serotonin imbalance, depression-like behavior in mice
A gene has been identified that allows neurons that release serotonin to evenly spread their branches throughout the brain. Without this gene, these branches become entangled, leading to haphazard serotonin distribution, and signs of depression in mice. These observations shed light on how neuronal wiring is critical to overall brain health, while also revealing a promising new research focus for psychiatric disorders associated with serotonin imbalance -- such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and autism.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levels
Glucoracle is a new app for people with type 2 diabetes that uses a personalized algorithm to predict the impact of particular foods on blood sugar levels.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Ocean acidification could impair the nitrogen-fixing ability of marine bacteria
While increased carbon dioxide levels theoretically boost the productivity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the world's oceans, because of its 'fertilizing' effect, a new study reveals how increasingly acidic seawater featuring higher levels of this gas can overwhelm these benefits, hampering the essential service these bacteria provide for marine life.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Cystic fibrosis: Interactions between bacteria that infect lungs uncovered
Substances produced by a harmful bacterium in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients may enhance the growth of other bacteria that, in turn, inhibit the harmful bacterium's biofilm, according to new research.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Intergalactic gas and ripples in the cosmic web
A team of astronomers has made the first measurements of small-scale ripples in primeval hydrogen gas using rare double quasars.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
DNA from extinct humans discovered in cave sediments
Researchers have developed a new method to retrieve hominin DNA from cave sediments -- even in the absence of skeletal remains.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
Stem cells edited to fight arthritis
Using CRISPR technology, a team of researchers rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually could act as a vaccine for arthritis and other chronic conditions.

04/05/2017 12:10 AM
For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap together
For the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws tiny crystals together and visualized how they swivel and align. Called van der Waals forces, the attraction provides insights into how crystals self-assemble, an activity that occurs in a wide range of cases in nature, from rocks to shells to bones.

04/05/2017 12:09 AM
Pregnancy does not increase expectant mothers' melanoma risk
Expectant mothers need not be concerned that they are more prone to develop melanoma, or will have a worse prognosis if they do get this serious skin cancer, than women who are not pregnant, according to a study.

04/05/2017 12:09 AM
Mouse teeth providing new insights into tissue regeneration
Researchers hope to one day use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch.

04/04/2017 11:54 PM
Underdiagnoses of age-related macular degeneration, findings suggest
Approximately 14 million Americans have age-related macular degeneration, and a new study suggests it may be underdiagnosed in primary eye care settings.

04/04/2017 11:52 PM
Nose2Brain: Better therapy for multiple sclerosis
Medically active substances are normally distributed via the blood -- either directly by injection into the bloodstream or indirectly, for example through the digestive tract after oral administration. In many diseases, however, it is of decisive importance to transport the active substance as efficiently as possible to the required target site. An example of this is the treatment of multiple sclerosis, where the pharmaceutical agents have to produce their effect above all in the central nervous system. However, this is especially difficult to achieve in the usual way via the blood due to special protective mechanisms such as the blood-brain barrier.

04/04/2017 11:52 PM
How plants form their sugar transport routes
In experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. These factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings substantially expand our understanding of the metabolic processes in plants.

04/04/2017 11:01 PM
Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's past
Ice cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.

04/04/2017 11:00 PM
Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?
Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age -- but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence, suggests a new study.