Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

08/17/2017 06:31 AM
Student discovers tuberculosis DNA in dental plaque of Smithsonian's anatomical collection
In a collection of historic skeletal remains at the Smithsonian, microscopic signs of a serious contagion lurk in an intriguing place in a sample of individuals from 100 years ago.

08/17/2017 06:10 AM
Studying a new treatment for a common men's condition
A New Zealand-first research study happening in Canterbury could make treatment of a common male condition easier and less painful.

08/17/2017 06:00 AM
History of stress increases miscarriage risk, says new review
A history of exposure to psychological stress can increase the risk of miscarriage by upto 42 per cent, according to a new review.

08/17/2017 06:00 AM
Why 'rage rooms' won't solve your anger issues
Rage rooms—where stressed out people go to relieve tension by smashing furniture, housewares, and electronics with baseball bats, crowbars, and sledgehammers—have become a global phenomenon. But taking out your frustration on chairs, dishes, flat-screen TVs—or fax machines, like a character from the 1999 cult classic Office Space—is not an effective form of anger management, according to Christie Rizzo, associate professor in the Department of Applied Psychology.

08/17/2017 05:57 AM
Study uncovers specialized mouse neurons that play a unique role in pain
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have identified a class of sensory neurons (nerve cells that electrically send and receive messages between the body and brain) that can be activated by stimuli as precise as the pulling of a single hair. Understanding basic mechanisms underlying these different types of responses will be an important step toward the rational design of new approaches to pain therapy. The findings were published in the journal Neuron.

08/17/2017 05:50 AM
Pushing patients to online care options may have unintended consequences
E-visits, electronic communications between patients and physicians, seemed to be an innovative way for health care providers to give patients a low-cost alternative to visiting the doctor's office. Creating an online channel for care delivery offered the promise of reducing health care costs, while increasing the capacity of primary care physicians to see more patients by allowing them to handle routine questions or concerns through e-visits. At the same time, e-visits were seen as an innovation that could improve patient health by allowing patients to receive more attention and increased monitoring.

08/17/2017 05:45 AM
Why state-level single-payer health care efforts are doomed
With members of Congress spending the month of August in their home districts, Republican efforts to do away with President Obama's signature legislative achievement, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), appear stalled, at least temporarily.

08/17/2017 05:43 AM
Are stem cells the link between bacteria and cancer?
Gastric carcinoma is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths, primarily because most patients present at an advanced stage of the disease. The main cause of this cancer is the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which chronically infects around half of all humans. However, unlike tumour viruses, bacteria do not deposit transforming genes in their host cells and how they are able to cause cancer has so far remained a mystery. An interdisciplinary research team at the Max Planck Institute in Berlin in collaboration with researchers in Stanford, California, has now discovered that the bacterium sends stem cell renewal in the stomach into overdrive – and stem cell turnover has been suspected by many scientists to play a role in the development of cancer. By showing that the stomach contains two different stem cell types, which respond differently to the same driver signal, they have uncovered a new mechanism of tissue plasticity. It allows tuning tissue renewal in response to bacterial infection.

08/17/2017 05:42 AM
Study shows probiotics can prevent sepsis in infants
A research team at the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health has determined that a special mixture of good bacteria in the body reduced the incidence of sepsis in infants in India by 40 percent at a cost of only $1 per infant. The findings are reported in the Aug. 16 issue of the journal Nature.

08/17/2017 05:40 AM
Tips for coping with rejection
With the school year starting soon, many students will be trying out for various sports teams and other activities, and while many will make these teams, others will not. Even though this rejection almost always stings, one Baylor College of Medicine expert has some tips for coping with rejection at any age.

08/17/2017 05:29 AM
Study finds children pay close attention to potentially threatening information, avoid eye contact when anxious
We spend a lot of time looking at the eyes of others for social cues – it helps us understand a person's emotions, and make decisions about how to respond to them. We also know that adults avoid eye contact when anxious. But researchers have known far less about "eye gazing" patterns in children.

08/17/2017 02:25 AM
Two lung diseases killed 3.6 million in 2015: study
The two most common chronic lung diseases claimed 3.6 million lives worldwide in 2015, according to a tally published Thursday in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

08/17/2017 02:20 AM
Australian researchers in peanut allergy breakthrough
Australian researchers have reported a major breakthrough in the relief of deadly peanut allergy with the discovery of a long-lasting treatment they say offers hope that a cure will soon be possible.

08/17/2017 02:15 AM
Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women
Women who live in areas with higher levels of outdoor light at night may be at higher risk for breast cancer than those living in areas with lower levels, according to a large long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The link was stronger among women who worked night shifts.

08/17/2017 02:11 AM
VA targets healthcare equity for all veterans—new research on reducing health disparities
In recent years, the Veterans Administration (VA) Healthcare System has expanded its efforts to target groups of veterans facing disparities in healthcare access and outcomes. An update on research toward advancing equitable healthcare for all veterans is presented in a September supplement to Medical Care.

08/17/2017 02:10 AM
Subarachnoid hemorrhage and the need for expert treatment
Research led by the head of the Barrow Neurological Institute and published in the July 20, 2017 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine reveals that subarachnoid hemorrhages, which are caused by ruptured brain aneurysms, account for 5-10 percent of all strokes and are best managed by experienced and dedicated experts at high-volume centers with neurosurgeons, endovascular surgeons and stroke neurologists. The article was co-authored by Barrow President and CEO Michael T. Lawton, M.D. and G. Edward Vates, M.D., Ph.D, of the University of Rochester Medical Center's Department of Neurosurgery."Subarachnoid hemorrhage victims tend to be younger than typical stroke victims, and they risk a greater loss of productive life," Dr. Lawton said. "It is critical that they receive the best treatment for aneurysms - like the multidisciplinary team approach and state-of-the-art therapy like that offered at Barrow."

08/17/2017 02:09 AM
In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have demonstrated that consuming walnuts activates an area in the brain associated with regulating hunger and cravings. The findings, published online in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, reveal for the first time the neurocognitive impact these nuts have on the brain.

08/17/2017 02:04 AM
Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status
Diet is believed to play a role in cancer risk. Current research shows that an estimated 30% of cancers could be prevented through nutritional modifications. While there is a proven link between obesity and certain types of cancer, less is known about how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy density (DED), contributes to cancer risk. To find out, researchers looked at DED in the diets of post-menopausal women and discovered that consuming high DED foods was tied to a 10% increase in obesity-related cancer among normal weight women. Their findings are published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

08/17/2017 02:00 AM
Science Says: DNA test results may not change health habits
If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

08/17/2017 01:59 AM
Cloudy water linked to gastrointestinal illnesses: Suspended particles give germs a place to hide
Cloudy drinking water, even if it's within the limits allowed by some cities, was linked to increased cases of gastrointestinal illness, according to new Drexel University analysis.

08/17/2017 01:57 AM
Daily e-cigarette users had highest rates of quitting smoking
Among U.S. adults who were established smokers in the past five years, those who use e-cigarettes daily were significantly more likely to have quit cigarettes compared to those who have never tried e-cigarettes. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Rutgers School of Public Health found that over half of daily e-cigarette users had quit smoking in the past five years, compared to just 28 percent of adults who had never tried e-cigarettes. This is one of the first studies to reveal the patterns of cessation prevalence among e-cigarette users at a national level.

08/17/2017 01:56 AM
Simulation shows the high cost of dementia, especially for families
A new simulation of how the costs and the course of the dementia epidemic affect U.S. families finds that neurodegenerative conditions can more than double the health care expenditures of aging and that the vast majority of that financial burden remains with families rather than government insurance programs.

08/16/2017 06:40 PM
Children who skip breakfast may not be getting recommended nutrients
A study by researchers at King's College London has found that children who skip breakfast regularly may not be consuming the daily amounts of key nutrients for growth and development that are recommended by the UK government.

08/16/2017 06:30 PM
Telling people not to 'down' drinks could make them drink more
Campaigns designed to stop young people "bolting" drinks can be ineffective and can even make them more likely to do it, new research suggests.

08/16/2017 06:00 PM
Study shows improved survival among premature babies, risk of developmental delay remains high
Survival of preterm babies has increased worldwide. Recent studies have focused on outcomes of extremely preterm children (born at 22-26 weeks' gestation), but outcomes of children born very and moderately preterm (between 27 and 34 weeks' gestation) have rarely been reported.

08/16/2017 05:50 PM
Why the definition of polycystic ovary syndrome harms women
The changed definition of polycystic ovary syndrome harms women and brings no clear benefit, say Australian scientists in today's British Medical Journal.

08/16/2017 04:30 PM
Senate ACA replacement bill failure related to divisions among Republicans and parties
A new in-depth analysis of results from 27 national public opinion polls by 12 survey organizations finds that the failure of the recent U.S. Senate debate over proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) relates to deep divisions among Republicans, as well as between Republicans and Democrats, on the future of the ACA. In addition, the analysis suggests that the outcome of the debate was influenced by a substantial growth since the ACA's implementation in public support for the principle that the federal government should ensure that all Americans have health insurance coverage.

08/16/2017 03:10 PM
Telemedicine as effective as in-person care for Parkinson's disease
New findings from a nationwide program that links neurologists with patients with Parkinson's disease in their homes via video conferencing shows that telemedicine can successfully deliver quality care. The study, which appears today in the journal Neurology, points to a new way to improve care for people who suffer from the disease, but may have not have access to a neurologist.

08/16/2017 03:10 PM
Technology is changing Generation smartphone, and not always for the better
It's easy to imagine some graybeard long ago weighing in on how this new generation, with all its fancy wheels, missed out on the benefits of dragging stuff from place to place.

08/16/2017 02:53 PM
New strategy to treat aggressive lung cancer
Research conducted by a team of Norton Thoracic Institute scientists on a novel therapeutic avenue for an aggressive and difficult to treat subgroup of lung cancer was published in the August 15, 2017 issue of Cancer Research. The research was led by assistant professors at Norton Thoracic Institute, Timothy Whitsett, PhD, and Landon Inge, PhD.