New Internationalist

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26/05/2018 02:03 AM
Supporting New Internationalist
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As news media face a crisis of legitimacy, reader supported alternatives offer a way forward, Chris Spannos writes.

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As news media face a crisis of legitimacy, reader supported alternatives offer a way forward, Chris Spannos writes

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26/05/2018 01:00 AM
Reclaiming the city
Ada Colau arrives at a municipal elections rally.
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In the Barcelona area, local governments and citizens are transforming municipal politics, finds Luke Stobart.

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Ada Colau arrives at a municipal elections rally.
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Progressive city governments in the Barcelona area have showed the world how turning back privatization is achievable at a local level. But there remain obstacles to be overcome, says Luke Stobart

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24/05/2018 05:48 PM
Mixed Media: Graphic novels
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My Brother’s Husband by Gengoroh Tagame; What does consent really mean? by Pete Wallis and Thalia Wallis, illustrated by Joseph Wilkins.

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My Brother’s Husband by Gengoroh Tagame; What does consent really mean? by Pete Wallis and Thalia Wallis, illustrated by Joseph Wilkins

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24/05/2018 05:08 PM
Country Profile: Lebanon
All smiles at a political rally in Beirut’s Martyr’s Square.
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Civil war, ISIS invasions, mountains of rubbish. Reem Haddad reports from Beirut.

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Lebanon
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Civil war, ISIS invasions, mountains of rubbish. Never a dull day in Lebanon. The country’s constant turmoil is exhausting, says Reem Haddad, reporting from Beirut

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The average salary of a Lebanese employee is about $500 per month, which barely covers the basic necessities. There is a significant wealthy elite and little serious government effort at redistribution.
Education standards are quite high in the state-run schools and the huge array of private ones; most children are expected to speak three languages fluently by the time they graduate.
79 years (Jordan 74, France 83).
Women represent 28% of the workforce – the highest in the Arab world. There are female doctors, lawyers, engineers and managers and the number of women entering the political arena and starting their own businesses has recently increased.
There are no political prisoners and freedom of expression allows lively debate. But many Lebanese have disappeared in the past for criticizing the Syrian government and are thought to be in Syrian prisons.
Homosexuality is illegal and imprisonable for a year, but is quietly tolerated. Four years ago, an advocacy group was established to promote LGBT rights – the first of its kind in the Arab world. The gay community has recently become more visible.
Lebanon has experienced some welcome stability in the past year since the election of President Michel Aoun and the formation of a new government headed by Hariri. In October 2016 Hariri finally agreed to support Hizbullah's candidate, Aoun, ending two-and-a-half years of deadlock between opposing parliamentary coalitions, one backed by the West and Saudi Arabia and the other by Syria and Iran. Hizbullah is now the paramount power in Lebanon. The continuing garbage crisis is a scandal that exposes the depth of corruption within the ruling elite.
April 2008
Head of state Michel Aoun; head of government Saad al-Hariri.
GNI per capita $7,980 (Jordan $3,920, France $38,720).
Lebanese pound.
6.1 million (annual growth rate 2.6%, not including influxes of refugees). People per square kilometre 575 (UK 271).
Infant mortality 7 deaths per 1,000 live births (Jordan 15, France 3). HIV prevalence rate <0.1. Hospitals have doctors schooled in Europe or the US and have modern equipment. But the many Lebanese without insurance end up without medical care or in poorly run clinics.
The garbage crisis has severely polluted many of Lebanon’s waterways. The piles of trash in the country’s few remaining forests could contribute to future deforestation by sparking bushfires. Street burning of trash poses grave health risks.
Predominantly Arab, but with strong Western influences. The Levant has been populated and influenced by numerous cultures over the millennia: Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Muslims, Crusaders, Ottoman Turks, French.
There has been no census since 1932, when there were similar numbers of Muslims and Christians. A new census is avoided so as not to upset sectarian sensibilities but it is accepted that the Muslim population is now larger than the Christian.
Arabic, officially, but French and English are widely spoken. The Lebanese are renowned for their ability to switch between languages.
0.763, 76th of 188 countries (Jordan 0.741, France 0.897)
Cement, chemicals, clothing, electrical equipment, jewellery, metals, textiles, tobacco. Lebanon has a free-market economy with minimal government regulations. Banking secrecy is a key feature. Agricultural output is still only 20% of that before the civil war, and less than a third of the country’s food is home-grown.
April 2008

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22/05/2018 05:43 PM
Can a new generation topple Ireland’s 8th amendment?
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This Friday’s vote demonstrates a vibrant and long overdue campaign for a secular republic, Éilis Ryan writes.

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This Friday’s vote demonstrates a vibrant and long overdue campaign for a secular republic, Éilis Ryan writes

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21/05/2018 11:30 PM
The almighty investor
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Lavinia Steinfort on the insidious 'investor protection mechanisms' stacking the odds in favour of corporations.

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Trying to take back failing privatized public services exposes governments to the risk of being sued for gargantuan amounts by foreign corporations. Lavinia Steinfort reports

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21/05/2018 10:34 PM
The efficiency myth
Passengers at Clapham Junction, south London. According to a 2017 Legatum Institute poll 76 per cent of British passengers want the railways in public ownership.
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Nick Dowson dismantles the notion that the private sector does things better.

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Passengers at Clapham Junction, south London. According to a 2017 Legatum Institute poll 76 per cent of British passengers want the railways in public ownership.
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Heard the tale about the private sector always doing things better? Nick Dowson wonders why it still has believers

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Passengers at Clapham Junction, south London. According to a 2017 Legatum Institute poll 76 per cent of British passengers want the railways in public ownership. Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters
Passengers at Clapham Junction, south London. According to a 2017 Legatum Institute poll 76 per cent of British passengers want the railways in public ownership. Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters

21/05/2018 10:30 PM
Jakarta's water woes
A drinking water vendor sets off, looking for customers in Jakarta’s poorest neighbourhoods. Photo: Solo Imaji/Barcroft Media via Getty
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A civil society lawsuit has ended the city's water sell-off. But the fight isn't over. Febriana Firdaus reports.

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A drinking water vendor sets off, looking for customers in Jakarta’s poorest neighbourhoods. Photo: Solo Imaji/Barcroft Media via Getty
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A court victory has rewarded civil society efforts to end water privatization in the Indonesian capital but many questions remain unanswered. Febriana Firdaus reports

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18/05/2018 05:39 PM
Goodbye to the monarchy?
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What do republican activists make of this royal wedding? Darren Loucaides finds out.

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On the eve of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, Darren Loucaides speaks to republican activists inside and outside parliament to find out whether the Windsor family’s days are numbered

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18/05/2018 09:36 AM
Will new laws tame the tech giants?
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Are these new privacy laws the best solution? Mike Morel investigates.

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The backlash against social media titans is in full swing. But are moves to bring them to heel, including new privacy laws, appropriate? Mike Morel investigates

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